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17th District Alaska Public Affairs
U.S. Coast Guard

News Release

August 15, 2012


U.S. Coast Guard 17th District Public Affairs

Contact: Petty Officer 2nd Class Grant DeVuyst

Email: grant.c.devuyst@uscg.mil

Office: (907) 463-2065

Mobile: (907) 321-1866

Multimedia Release: Coast Guard evaluates arctic amphibious craft

Editors Note: Click the images below for high resolution photos and video

Amphibious craft operators demonstrate the capability of their products for Coast Guard personnel in Barrow, Alaska, Aug. 13, 2012. As the Coast Guard's role in the Arctic adjusts to new developments in the region, a different class of craft will be required to complete the statutory missions of the Coast Guard. U.S. Coast Guard video by Petty Officer 3rd Class Grant DeVuyst.   Cmdr. Rich Condit, of the Coast Guard Office of Boat Forces, and Chief Warrant Officer Mark Helmers, of the 17th Coast Guard District response division, watch a prototype amphibious vessel, developed by Tyler Rentals of Ketchikan, Alaska, while standing on an ice floe 10 miles off the coast of Barrow Aug. 13, 2012. Coast Guard Research and Development Center personnel initiated an evaluation of amphibious vessels in the Arctic to document challenges associated with operating craft in the extreme environment. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Grant DeVuyst.   Arktos Developments personnel drive their amphibious craft onto an ice floe during a demonstration for the Coast Guard 10 miles off the coast of Barrow, Alaska, Aug. 13, 2012. The ice-capability display provided Coast Guard personnel with insight for development of a future Coast Guard Arctic craft. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Grant DeVuyst.

Chief Warrant Officer Mark Helmers, of the 17th Coast Guard District response division, holds on to the railing of an Arktos Developments amphibious craft as the crew maneuvers off an ice floe 10 miles off the coast of Barrow, Alaska, Aug. 13, 2012. The amphibious craft were driven into icy conditions so that Coast Guard representatives could observe the capability of modern amphibious vehicles. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Grant DeVuyst.   Cmdr. Rich Condit and Lt. Niko Schellman, both of the Coast Guard Office of Boat Forces, watch as an Arktos Developments amphibious craft ramps onto an ice floe 10 miles off the coast of Barrow, Alaska, Aug. 13, 2012. Coast Guard personnel from the Office of Boat Forces, the 17th Coast Guard District and the Coast Guard Research and Development Center evaluated two amphibious craft to examine currently available technologies in the field of multi-terrain transportation. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Grant DeVuyst.   Chief Warrant Officer Mark Helmers, of the 17th Coast Guard District response division, watches as Cmdr. Rich Condit, with the Coast Guard Office of Boat Forces, climbs down the ladder of an amphibious craft onto an ice floe 10 miles off the coast of Barrow, Alaska, Aug. 13, 2012. Helmers and Condit, along with personnel from the Coast Guard Research and Development Center, visited Barrow to evaluate two amphibious craft for their ability to function in the Arctic environment. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Grant DeVuyst.   Chief Warrant Officer Mark Helmers, of the 17th Coast Guard District response division, rides an Arktos Developments amphibious craft away from the coast of Barrow, Alaska, during an evaluation Aug. 12, 2012. Coast Guard personnel from the 17th District, the Coast Guard Research and Development Center and Coast Guard Boat Forces travelled to Barrow to watch amphibious ice-capable craft at work. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Grant DeVuyst.

BARROW, Alaska – Personnel from the 17th Coast Guard District and the Coast Guard Office of Boat Forces are assisting the Coast Guard Research and Development Center in conducting evaluations on some Arctic craft in Barrow Aug. 13-17, 2012.

As the Coast Guard’s role above the Arctic Circle expands, boats, or vessels smaller than 65-feet long, capable of operating in icy conditions are becoming necessary to accomplish parts of the Coast Guard’s statutory missions.

“We’re looking for a craft that is capable of transiting through and over ice and ice-strewn water,” said Rich Hansen, a Branch Chief at the Coast Guard Research and Development Center, in New London, Conn. “We’re also looking for shallow water capability, and the ability to operate in areas with minimal infrastructure. Ideally we would like to find something that could be flown in on Coast Guard aircraft in the event of an incident requiring our response.”

The Center solicited industry participation through a Broad Agency Announcement earlier this year.

During the one-week evaluation, the Coast Guard personnel on scene will document the demonstrations for assessment by the Coast Guard Research and Development Center.

“This demonstration is only evaluating potential technologies that may provide improved capabilities in the arctic environment,” said Hansen. “The information gained will be used by the Coast Guard to explore its options for operating in this challenging environment.”

At this time there is not an active acquisition activity for either of the craft being observed.

For more information, contact Rich Hansen at 860-271-2866.

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